Read my original nature poems right here!

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90 Timeless Dostoevsky Quotes

Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) was a Russian novelist, philosopher, and journalist, regarded as one of the greatest psychological novelists in world literature. Born in Moscow, Dostoevsky studied at the St. Petersburg Military Engineering Academy before leaving to pursue writing. His early works, such as “Poor Folk” and “The Double,” established his reputation as a writer, but it was his later novels, including “Crime and Punishment,” “The Brothers Karamazov,” and “The Idiot,” that cemented his legacy. Dostoevsky’s works often explore themes of existentialism, morality, and redemption, and he is known for his deep psychological insight into his characters.

His contributions to literature have influenced countless writers and thinkers, and his impact on the development of modern literature cannot be overstated.

Dostoevsky’s personal life was marked by tragedy, including the loss of his father when he was just 15 years old, and his own imprisonment for political activism. He was sentenced to death by firing squad in 1849, but at the last moment, his sentence was commuted to four years of hard labor in Siberia. This experience deeply influenced his writing and provided him with insights into the human condition that are reflected in his works.

Despite facing personal and financial struggles throughout his life, Dostoevsky remained committed to his writing and continued to produce powerful works until his death at the age of 59. Today, he is considered a literary giant whose contributions continue to resonate with readers around the world.

Dostoevsky Quotes from Crime and Punishment

Crime and Punishment is about the grief and illness of Rodion Raskolnikov, a poor former student in St. Petersburg, who murders an old pawnbroker and her sister. Raskolnikov believes he is a superior being and justifies the crime as a way to prove his own greatness. However, his guilt and fear begin to consume him, and he is driven mad, egged on by a detective named Porfiry Petrovich.

The novel explores themes of morality, guilt, and redemption, and is considered one of the greatest works of Russian literature. It is certainly one of my favorite books, and has some of my favorite Dostoevsky quotes. My favorites below are highlighted yellow.

You can read Crime and Punishment for free right here on Project Gutenberg.

Crime and Punishment Quotes

1. He was so immersed in himself and had isolated himself so much from everyone that he was afraid not only of meeting his landlady but of meeting anyone at all.
Crime and Punishment

2. “And besides, if one wants to know any man well, one must consider him gradually and carefully so as to not fall into error and prejudice, which are very difficult to correct and smooth out later.”
Pulcheria Raskolnikov, Crime and Punishment

3. “Do you understand, do you understand, my dear sir, what it means when there is no longer anywhere to go?”
Marmeladov, Crime and Punishment

4. …with that strange feeling of inner satisfaction which can always be observed, even in those who are near and dear, when a sudden disaster befalls their neighbor, and which is to be found in all men, without exception, however sincere their feelings of sympathy and commiseration.
Crime and Punishment

5. Pyotr Petrovich, who for some reason had cashed several five percent bank notes that morning, sat at the table and counted through the bundles of bills and series. Andrei Semyonovich, who almost never had any money, was pacing the room, pretending to himself that he looked upon all those bundles with indifference, and even with contempt. Pyotr Petrovich would in no way have believed, for example, that Andrei Semyonovich could indeed look upon so much money with indifference; and Andrei Semyonovich, in his turn, reflected bitterly that Pyotr Petrovich was indeed capable of having such thoughts about him, and, furthermore, was perhaps glad of the chance to prod and tease his young friend with the laid out bundles of bills, reminding him of his nonentity and all the difference supposedly existing between the two of them.
Crime and Punishment

6. “And if we look straight, in all ways–will there be many good people left? No, in that case I’m sure that I, with all my innards, would be worth about as much as one baked onion, and then only with you thrown in!…”
Razumikhin, Crime and Punishment

7. “Practicality is acquired with effort, it doesn’t fall from the sky for free.”
Razumikhin, Crime and Punishment

8. “What came of it [‘love my neighbor’] was that I tore my caftan in two, shared it with my neighbor, and we were both left half naked, as the Russian proverb says: If you chase several hares at once, you won’t catch any of them!”
Pyotr Petrovich, Crime and Punishment

9. “We got onto the eternal questions, and it all stayed in the clouds.”
Razumikhin, Crime and Punishment

10. “And I say that you, with all your virtues, are not worth the little finger of that unfortunate girl at whom you are casting a stone.”
Raskolnikov, Crime and Punishment

11. “Your article is absurd and fantastic, but there are flashes of such sincerity in it, there is pride in it, youthful and incorruptible, there is the courage of despair; it’s a gloomy article, sir, but that’s a good thing.”
Porfiry Petrovich, Crime and Punishment

12. “What, won’t you allow that such a nation as ours produces fantastic people?”
Porfiry Petrovich, Crime and Punishment

13. “One seldom finds a place where there are so many gloomy, sharp, and strange influences on the soul of man as in Petersburg.”
Svidrigailov, Crime and Punishment

14. This alone he recognized as his crime: that he had not endured it, but had gone and confessed.
Crime and Punishment

15. We sometimes encounter people, even perfect strangers, who begin to interest us at first sight, somehow suddenly, all at once, before a word has been spoken.
Crime and Punishment

16. “Lying is man’s only privilege over all other organisms.”
Razumikhin, Crime and Punishment

17. “Indeed, in that sense we’re all rather often almost like mad people, only with the slight difference that the ‘sick’ are somewhat madder than we are, so that it’s necessary to draw a line here. And the harmonious man, it’s true, almost doesn’t exist; out of tens, maybe hundreds of thousands, one will be found, and quite a weak specimen at that…”
Zossimov, Crime and Punishment

18. “He’s an intelligent man, but it takes something more than intelligence to act intelligently.
Raskolnikov, Crime and Punishment

19. As soon as he heard that his guest had “a little business” with him, he at once asked him to sit down on the sofa, sat down himself at the other end, and stared at his guest, expecting an immediate account of the business, with the sort of eager and all too serious attention that from the first becomes burdensome and embarrassing, especially for a stranger, and especially when what is being recounted seems, in one’s own opinion, out of all proportion to the unusually weighty attention accorded it.
Crime and Punishment

20. “I only believe in my main idea. It consists precisely in people being divided generally, according to the law of nature, into two categories: a lower one, ordinary people, who are, so to speak, material serving solely for the reproduction of their own kind; and proper people–that is, those who have the gift or talent of speaking a new word into their environment.”
Raskolnikov, Crime and Punishment

21. “There’s nothing in the world more difficult than candor, and nothing easier than flattery. If there is only the hundredth part of a false note in candor, there is immediately a dissonance, and then–scandal. But with flattery, even if everything is false down to the last little note, it is still agreeable and is listened to not without pleasure; crude though the pleasure may be, it is still a treasure.”
Svidrigailov, Crime and Punishment

Dostoevsky Quotes from The Brothers Karamazov

The Brothers Karamazov was the second Dostoevsky book I read and it (slowly…it’s a long book) became an all-time favorite book of mine. There are love triangles, murder, deceit, religion, and family drama all viewed through the lens of a small Russian town, with its peasants and noble families. If you enjoy long books and old literature, The Brothers K will not disappoint. Can I recommend a book just based on being long and old? I think so. I’d take that recommendation.

The Brothers K has multiple striking, memorable scenes (even a pretty famous one called The Grand Inquisitor) and more than a few thought-provoking quotes. My favorites below are highlighted yellow.

You can read The Brothers Karamazov for free right here on Project Gutenberg.

The Brothers Karamazov Quotes

22. I knew a young lady of the last “romantic” generation who after some years of an enigmatic passion for a gentleman, whom she might quite easily have married at any moment, invented insuperable obstacles to their union, and ended by throwing herself one stormy night into a rather deep and rapid river from a high bank, almost a precipice, and so perished, entirely to satisfy her own caprice, and to be like Shakespeare’s Ophelia. Indeed, if this precipice, a chosen and favorite spot of hers, had been less picturesque, if there had been a prosaic flat bank in its place, most like the suicide would never have taken place.
The Brothers Karamazov

23. As a general rule, people, even the wicked, are much more naïve and simple-hearted than we suppose. And we ourselves are, too.
The Brothers Karamazov

24. He never resented an insult. It would happen that an hour after the offense he would address the offender or answer some question with as trustful and candid an expression as though nothing had happened between them.
About Alyosha | The Brothers Karamazov

25. There was something about him which made one feel at once (and it was so for all his life afterwards) that he did not care to be a judge of others–that he would never take it upon himself to criticize and would never condemn any one for anything.
About Alyosha | The Brothers Karamazov

26. Alyosha’s arrival seemed to affect even his moral side, as though something had awakened in this prematurely old man which had long been dead in his soul.
The Brothers Karamazov

27. “It’s impossible, I think, for the devils to forget to drag me down to hell with their hooks when I die. Then I wonder–hooks? Where would they get them? What of? Iron hooks? Where do they forge them? Have they a foundry there of some sort? The monks in the monastery probably believe that there’s a ceiling in hell, for instance. Now I’m ready to believe in hell, but without a ceiling. It makes it more refined, more enlightened, more Lutheran that is. And, after all, what does it matter whether it has a ceiling or hasn’t? But, do you know, there’s a damnable question involved in it. If there’s no ceiling there can be no hooks, and if there are no hooks it all breaks down, which is unlikely again, for then there would be none to drag me down to hell, and if they don’t drag me down what justice is there in the world?”
Fyodor Pavlovitch, The Brothers Karamazov

28. “I feel that you’re the only creature in the world who has not condemned me.”
Fyodor Pavlovitch, The Brothers Karamazov

29. Faith does not, in the realist, spring from the miracle but the miracle from faith.
The Brothers Karamazov

30. Oh! no doubt, in the monastery he fully believed in miracles, but, to my thinking, miracles are never a stumbling-block to the realist.
The Brothers Karamazov

31. Though these young men unhappily fail to understand that the sacrifice of life in, in many cases, the easiest of all sacrifices, and that to sacrifice, for instance, five or six years of their seething youth to hard and tedious study, if only to multiply tenfold their powers of serving truth and the cause they have set before them as their goal–such sacrifice is utterly beyond the strength of many of them.
The Brothers Karamazov

32. He entered upon this path only because, at that time, it alone struck his imagination and presented itself to him as offering an ideal means of escape for his soul from darkness to light.
The Brothers Karamazov

33. For socialism is not merely the labor question, it is before all things the atheistic question, the question of the form taken by atheism to-day, the question of the tower of Babel built without God, not to mount to heaven from earth but to set up heaven on earth.
The Brothers Karamazov

34. He had a high opinion of his own insight, a weakness excusable in him as he was fifty, an age at which a clever man of the world of established position can hardly help taking himself rather seriously.
The Brothers Karamazov

35. If I had only been sure that every one would accept me as the kindest and wisest of men, oh, Lord, what a good man I should have been then!
Fyodor Pavlovitch, The Brothers Karamazov

36. The man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to such a pass that he cannot distinguish the truth within him, or around him, and so loses all respect for himself and for others.
The Brothers Karamazov

37. The man who lies to himself can be more easily offended than any one.
The Brothers Karamazov

38. Lamentations comfort only by lacerating the heart still more. Such grief does not desire consolation. It feeds on the sense of its hopelessness. Lamentations spring only from the constant craving to reopen the wound.
The Brothers Karamazov

39. “Think only of repentance, continual repentance, but dismiss fear altogether. Believe that God loves you as you cannot conceive; that He loves you with your sin, in your sin.”
Father Zossima, The Brothers Karamazov

40. “For men are made for happiness, and any one who is completely happy has a right to say to himself, ‘I am doing God’s will on earth.’ All the righteous, all the saints, all the holy martyrs were happy.”
Father Zossima, The Brothers Karamazov

41. “Strive to love your neighbor actively and indefatigably. In as far as you advance in love you will grow surer of the reality of God and of the immortality of your soul. If you attain to perfect self-forgetfulness in the love of your neighbor, then you will believe without a doubt, and no doubt can possibly enter your soul.”
Father Zossima, The Brothers Karamazov

42. “‘But it has always happened to me that the more I detest men individually the more ardent becomes my love for humanity.’”
Father Zossima, The Brothers Karamazov

43. “What seems to you bad within you will grow purer from the very fact of your observing it in yourself.”
Father Zossima, The Brothers Karamazov

44. “…love in action is a harsh and dreadful thing compared with love in dreams. Love in dreams is greedy for immediate action, rapidly performed and in the sight of all. Men will even give their lives if only the ordeal does not last long but is soon over, with all looking on and applauding as though on the stage. But active love is labor and fortitude, and for some people too, perhaps, a complete science.”
Father Zossima, The Brothers Karamazov

45. “…the Christian society now is not ready and is only resting on some seven righteous men, but as they are never lacking, it will continue still unshaken in expectation of its complete transformation from a society almost heathen in character into a single universal and all-powerful Church.”
Father Zossima, The Brothers Karamazov

46. “The socialist who is a Christian is more to be dreaded than a socialist who is an atheist.”
Pyotr Alexandrovich Miusov, The Brothers Karamazov

47. “There is no virtue if there is no immortality.”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

48. “You eat a gudgeon a day, and you think you bribe God with gudgeon.”
Fyodor Pavlovitch, The Brothers Karamazov

49. “The worldly may follow the dead with tears…”
Father Zossima, The Brothers Karamazov

50. “That’s always the way with these crazy fanatics; they cross themselves at the tavern and throw stones at the temple.”
Rakitin, The Brothers Karamazov

51. “He is one of those who don’t want millions, but an answer to their questions.”
Alyosha, The Brothers Karamazov

52. “Humanity will find in itself the power to live for virtue even without believing in immortality. It will find it in love for freedom, for equality, for fraternity.”
Rakitin, The Brothers Karamazov

53. “He has done me no harm. But I played him a dirty trick, and ever since I have hated him.”
Fyodor Pavlovitch, The Brothers Karamazov

54. But as soon as he had uttered his foolish tirade, he felt he had been talking absurd nonsense, and at once longed to prove to his audience, and above all to himself, that he had not been talking nonsense. And, though he knew perfectly well that with each word he would be adding more and more absurdity, he could not restrain himself, and plunged forward blindly.
The Brothers Karamazov

55. “No, saintly monk, you try being virtuous in the world, do good to society, without shutting yourself up in a monastery at other people’s expense, and without expecting a reward up aloft for it–you’ll find that a bit harder.”
Fyodor Pavlovitch, The Brothers Karamazov

56. “Beauty is a terrible and awful thing! It is terrible because it has not been fathomed and never can be fathomed, for God sets us nothing but riddles.”
Mitya, The Brothers Karamazov

57. There is a remarkable picture by the painter Kramskoy, called “Contemplation.” There is a forest in winter, and on a roadway through the forest, in absolute solitude, stands a peasant in a torn kaftan and bark shoes. He stands, as it were, lost in thought. Yet he is not thinking; he is “contemplating.” If any one touched him he would start and look at one as though awakening and bewildered. It’s true he would come to himself immediately; but if he were asked what he had been thinking about, he would remember nothing. Yet probably he has, hidden within himself, the impression which had dominated him during the period of contemplation. Those impressions are dear to him and no doubt he hoards them imperceptibly, and even unconsciously. How and why, of course, he does not know either. He may suddenly, after hoarding impressions for many years, abandon everything and go off to Jerusalem on a pilgrimage for his soul’s salvation, or perhaps he will suddenly set fire to his native village, and perhaps do both.
The Brothers Karamazov

58. “Again, taking into consideration that no one in our day, not only you, but actually no one, from the highest person to the lowest peasant, can shove mountains into the sea–except perhaps some one man in the world, or, at most, two, and they most likely are saving their souls in secret somewhere in the Egyptian desert, so you wouldn’t find them–if so it be, if all the rest have no faith, will God curse all the rest?”
Smerdyakov, The Brothers Karamazov

59. “We’ve left off thrashing the peasants, we’ve grown so clever, but they go on thrashing themselves.”
Fyodor Pavlovitch, The Brothers Karamazov

60. “My dear, if you only knew how I hate Russia… That is, not Russia, but all this vice! But maybe I mean Russia.”
Fyodor Pavlovitch, The Brothers Karamazov

61. “Maybe, remembering this great day, you will not forget my words, uttered from the heart for your guidance, seeing you are young, and the temptations of the world are great and beyond your strength to endure.”
Father Paissy, The Brothers Karamazov

62. “For sin is sweet; all abuse it, but all men live in it, only others do it on the sly, and I openly.”
Fyodor Pavlovitch, The Brothers Karamazov

63. “…the children of the poor gentlemen looked down upon by every one know what justice means, sir, even at nine years old. How should the rich know? They don’t explore such depths once in their lives.”
Captain Snegiryov, The Brothers Karamazov

64. “Pine-trees are not like people…they don’t change quickly.”
Madame Hohlakov, The Brothers Karamazov

65. “So far as it’s poetry, it’s essential rubbish. Consider yourself, who ever talks in rhyme? And if we were all to talk in rhyme, even though it were decreed by the government, we shouldn’t say much, should we?”
Smerdyakov, The Brothers Karamazov

66. “…if I didn’t believe in life, if I lost faith in the woman I love, lost faith in the order of things, were convinced in fact that everything is a disorderly, damnable, and perhaps devil-ridden chaos, if I were struck by every horror of man’s disillusionment–still I should want to live and, having once tasted of the cup, I would not turn away from it till I had drained it!”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

67. “Though I may not believe in the order of the universe, yet I love the sticky little leaves as they open in the spring. I love the blue sky, I love some people, whom one loves you know sometimes without knowing why. I love some great deeds done by men, though I’ve long ceased perhaps to have faith in them, yet from old habit one’s heart prizes them.”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

68. “One longs to love with one’s inside, with one’s stomach.”
Alyosha, The Brothers Karamazov

69. “It’s different for other people; but we in our green youth have to settle the eternal questions first of all. That’s what we care about.”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

70. “…the marvel is that such an idea, the idea of the necessity of God, could enter the head of such a savage, vicious beast as man. So holy it is, so touching, so wise and so great a credit it does to man. As for me, I’ve long resolved not to think whether man created God or God man.”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

71. “…if God exists and He really did create the world, then, as we all know, He created it according to the geometry of Euclid…”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

72. “I acknowledge humbly that I have no faculty for settling such questions, I have a Euclidian earthly mind, and how could I solve problems that are not of this world?”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

73. “I believe like a child that suffering will be healed and made up for, that all the humiliating absurdity of human contradictions will vanish like a pitiful mirage, like the despicable fabrication of the impotent and infinitely small Euclidian mind of man, that in the world’s finale, at the moment of eternal harmony, something so precious will come to pass that it will suffice for all hearts, for the comforting of all resentments, for the atonement of all the crimes of humanity, of all the blood they’ve shed; that it will make it not only possible to forgive but to justify all that has happened with men–but though all that may come to pass, I don’t accept it. I won’t accept it. Even if parallel lines do meet and I see it myself, I shall see it and say that they’ve met, but still I won’t accept it.”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

74. “…the stupider one is, the clearer one is. Stupidity is brief and artless, while intelligence wriggles and hides itself. Intelligence is a knave, but stupidity is honest and straightforward. I’ve led the conversation to my despair, and the more stupidly I have presented it, the better for me.”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

75. “I could never understand how one can love one’s neighbors. It’s just one’s neighbors, to my mind, that one can’t love, though one might love those at a distance.”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

76. “People talk sometimes of bestial cruelty, but that’s a great injustice and insult to the beasts; a beast can never be so cruel as a man, so artistically cruel.”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

77. “I think if the devil doesn’t exist, but man has created him, he has created him in his own image and likeness.”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

78. “Let me tell you, novice, that the absurd is only too necessary on earth. The world stands on absurdities, and perhaps nothing would have come to pass in it without them.”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

79. “Surely I haven’t suffered, simply that I, my crimes and my sufferings, may manure the soil of the future harmony for somebody else…I want to be there when every one suddenly understands what is has all been for.”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

80. “Men are to blame, I suppose; they were given paradise, they wanted freedom, and stole fire from heaven, though they knew they would become unhappy, so there is no need to pity them.”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

81. “If all must suffer to pay for the eternal harmony, what have children to do with it, tell me, please?”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

The Grand Inquisitor Quotes

The grand inquisitor is a “poem in prose” made up by Ivan in The Brothers Karamazov. It is a famous riddle of sorts, an argument and critique of Christianity, especially the Roman Catholic Church. It takes place in the sixteenth century, long before Ivan shared it with Alyosha, his first listener.

The Grand Inquisitor is perhaps the greatest chapter, most thought-provoking cornerstone, of the book (in my opinion, at least). I re-read this chapter three or four times, following his references and reasoning, and trying to make sense of it.

Pairing this part of Brothers K with Ivan’s conversation with the devil, and I think we have the book’s most compelling character: Ivan Karamazov.

82. “You see, my action [The Grand Inquisitor] takes place in the sixteenth century, and at that time, as you probably learnt at school, it was customary in poetry to bring down heavenly powers on Earth.”
Ivan, The Brothers Karamazov

83. “He is not dressed in his gorgeous cardinal’s robes, as he was the day before, when he was burning the enemies of the Roman Church–at this moment he is wearing his coarse, old, monk’s cassock.”
Ivan, The Grand Inquisitor, The Brothers Karamazov

84. “…if you are so corrupted by modern realism and can’t stand anything fantastic…”
Ivan, The Grand Inquisitor, The Brothers Karamazov

85. “The old man has told Him He hasn’t the right to add anything to what He has said of old. One may say it is the most fundamental feature of Roman Catholicism, in my opinion at least. ‘All has been given by Thee to the Pope,’ they say, ‘and all, therefore, is still in the Pope’s hands, and there is no need for Thee to come now at all. Thou must not meddle for the time, at least.'”
Ivan, The Grand Inquisitor, The Brothers Karamazov

86. “‘And yet if there has ever been on earth a real stupendous miracle, it took place on that day, on the day of the three temptations. The statement of those three questions was itself the miracle. If it were possible to imagine simply for the sake of argument that those three questions of the dread spirit had perished utterly from the books, and that we had to restore them and to invent them anew, and to do so had gathered together all the wise men of the earth–rulers, chief priests, learned men, philosophers, poets–and had set them the task to invent three questions, such as would not only fit the occasion, but express in three words, three human phrases, the whole future history of the world and of humanity–dost Thou believe that all the wisdom of the earth united could have invented anything in depth and force equal to the three questions which were actually put to Thee then by the wise and mighty spirit in the wilderness? From those questions alone, from the miracle of their statement, we can see that we have here to do not with the fleeting human intelligence, but with the absolute and eternal. For in those three questions the whole subsequent history of mankind is, as it were, brought together into one whole, and foretold, and in them are united all the unsolved historical contradictions of human nature.'”
The cardinal speaking to Jesus, The Grand Inquisitor, The Brothers Karamazov

87. “‘…for nothing has ever been more insupportable for a man and a human society than freedom.'”
The cardinal speaking to Jesus, The Grand Inquisitor, The Brothers Karamazov

88. “‘”But seest Thou these stones in this parched and barren wilderness? Turn them into bread, and mankind will run after Thee like a flock of sheep, grateful and obedient, though for ever trembling, lest Thou withdraw Thy hand and deny them Thy bread.” But Thou wouldst not deprive man of freedom and didst reject the offer, thinking, what is that freedom worth, if obedience is bought with bread? Thou didst reply that man lives not by bread alone. But dost Thou know that for the sake of that earthly bread the spirit of the earth will rise up against Thee and will strive with Thee and will overcome Thee, and all will follow him, crying, “Who can compare with this beast? He has given us fire from heaven!” Dost Thou know that the ages will pass, and humanity will proclaim by the lips of their sages that their is no crime, and therefore no sin; there is only hunger? “Feed men, and then ask them of virtue!” that’s what they’ll write on the banner, which they will raise against Thee, and with which they will destroy Thy temple.'”
The cardinal speaking to Jesus, The Grand Inquisitor, The Brothers Karamazov

89. “‘…freedom and bread enough for all are inconceivable together, for never, never will they be able to share between them!'”
The cardinal speaking to Jesus, The Grand Inquisitor, The Brothers Karamazov

90. “‘Thou didst promise them the bread of Heaven, but, I repeat again, can it compare with earthly bread in the eyes of the weak, ever sinful and ignoble race of man? And if for the sake of the bread of Heaven thousands shall follow Thee, what is to become of the millions and tens of thousands of millions of creatures who will not have the strength to forego the earthly bread for the sake of the heavenly?'”
The cardinal speaking to Jesus, The Grand Inquisitor, The Brothers Karamazov

Did you know you can read all of these Fyodr Dostoevsky quotes in his timeless books for free thanks to Project Gutenberg? Tap here to check it out!

George
Georgehttps://georgecallahan.com
George Callahan is the creator of Pine Tree Poet. He is an author of fantasy stories and an adventure poet. He prefers mountains and pine trees to most other things, and usually takes his dog Cowboy along for the ride.

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